Sushi Recipes – Sushi Cooking Recipes

Sushi Recipes

Sushi Cooking Recipes

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Sushi (すし, 寿司, 鮨?) is a food preparation originating in Japan, consisting of cooked vinegared rice (鮨飯 sushi-meshi?) combined with other ingredients (ネタ neta?) such as raw seafood, vegetables and sometimes tropical fruits. Ingredients and forms of sushi presentation vary widely, but the ingredient which all sushi have in common is rice (also referred to as shari (しゃり?) or sumeshi (酢飯?)).

Sushi can be prepared with either brown or white rice. It is often prepared with raw seafood, but some common varieties of sushi use cooked ingredients or are vegetarian. Raw fish (or occasionally other meat) sliced and served without rice is called “sashimi”. Sushi is often served with pickled ginger (ガリ gari), wasabi, and soy sauce. Popular garnishes are often made using daikon.

Types of sushi. : nigirizushi, makizushi, temaki.
The common ingredient across all kinds of sushi is vinegared sushi rice. Variety arises from fillings, toppings, condiments, and preparation. Traditional versus contemporary methods of assembly may create very different results from very similar ingredients.[10] In spelling sushi, its first letter s is replaced with z when a prefix is attached, as in nigirizushi, due to consonant mutation called rendaku in Japanese.

Chirashizushi

Chirashizushi with raw ingredients
Chirashizushi (ちらし寿司, “scattered sushi”) is a bowl of sushi rice topped with a variety of raw fish and vegetables/garnishes (also refers to barazushi). There is no set formula for the ingredients; they are either chef’s choice or specified by the customer. It is commonly eaten because it is filling, fast and easy to make. Chirashizushi also often varies regionally. It is eaten annually on Hinamatsuri in March.

Edomae chirashizushi (Edo-style scattered sushi) is served with uncooked ingredients which are arranged artfully on top of the sushi rice in a bowl.
Gomokuzushi (Kansai-style sushi) consists of cooked or uncooked ingredients mixed in the body of rice in a bowl.
Sake-zushi (Kyushu-style sushi) is a variety where instead of rice vinegar, rice wine is used in the mixture of the rice, and is topped with shrimp, sea bream, octopus, shiitake mushrooms, bamboo shoots and shredded omelette.

Inarizushi
Inarizushi (稲荷寿司) is a pouch of fried tofu typically filled with sushi rice alone. It is named after the Shinto god Inari, who is believed to have a fondness for fried tofu. The pouch is normally fashioned as deep-fried tofu (油揚げ, abura age). Regional variations include pouches made of a thin omelette (帛紗寿司, fukusa-zushi, or 茶巾寿司, chakin-zushi). It should not be confused with inari maki, which is a roll filled with flavored fried tofu.

Makizushi

Futomaki

Makizushi (巻き寿司, “rolled sushi”), norimaki (海苔巻き, “Nori roll”) or makimono (巻物, “variety of rolls”) is a cylindrical piece, formed with the help of a bamboo mat known as a makisu (巻簾)

Futomaki (太巻, “thick, large or fat rolls”) is a large cylindrical piece, usually with nori on the outside.
Hosomaki (細巻, “thin rolls”) is a small cylindrical piece, with nori on the outside. A typical hosomaki has a diameter of about two and a half centimeters
Ehōmaki with a setsubun mask.
Ehōmaki (恵方巻, “lucky direction roll”) is a roll composed of seven ingredients considered to be lucky.

Temaki (手巻, “hand roll”) is a large cone-shaped piece of nori on the outside and the ingredients spilling out the wide end. A typical temaki is about ten centimeters (4 in) long, and is eaten with fingers because it is too awkward to pick it up with chopsticks. ]

Narezushi

funa-zushi (narezushi made from a crucian carp species)
Narezushi (熟れ寿司, “matured sushi”) is a traditional form of fermented sushi.

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